Frequent Questions

What about carbon monoxide detectors?

Carbon monoxide (CO) is a colorless, odorless gas which at high levels can cause serious illness and death. CO alarms are widely available and should be considered a back-up to BUT NOT A REPLACEMENT for proper installation, use, and maintenance of fuel-burning appliances. CO alarms are designed to warn you of any unusual build-up of CO in your home. These higher levels of CO may occur from improperly maintained, installed or used fuel-burning appliances, backdrafting appliances or fireplaces, or idling cars in garages. If a CO alarm is to be installed:

  1. Make sure the device is certified to the most current Underwriters Laboratory (UL) standard 2034 or the International Approval Services (IAS) 6-96 standard.
  2. Install a CO alarm in the hallway near every separate sleeping area.
  3. Be aware of all instructions and warnings associated with the CO alarm.

CPSC Recommends Carbon Monoxide Alarm for Every Home (January 18, 2001 CPSC Release # 01-069)

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) recommends that every home should have a carbon monoxide (CO) alarm. CPSC also urges consumers to have a professional inspection of all fuel- burning appliances -- including furnaces, stoves, fireplaces, clothes dryers, water heaters, and space heaters -- to detect deadly carbon monoxide leaks.  CPSC recommends that every home should have at least one CO alarm that meets the requirements of the most recent Underwriters Laboratories (UL) 2034 standard or International Approval Services 6-96 standard.  www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/prerel/prhtml01/01069.html

 Product Safety Tips - Carbon Monoxide Alarms - www.ul.com/consumers/co.html Underwriters' Laboratory

"Your Home and Your Health"  www.cmhc-schl.gc.ca/en/co/maho/yohoyohe/index.cfm  Canadian Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC)

"What You Need to Know about Carbon Monoxide Detectors" www.chemistry.about.com/library/weekly/aa092202a.htm  About.com

Disposing of Smoke Detectors - www.epa.gov/radiation/sources/smoke_dispose.htm - EPA's Radiation Protection Division

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